Creator’s Corner: Patrick Davenport, Peachy Green Clean Cooperative

By January 27, 2020News

Businesses often get a reputation for being exploitative, both to people and to the environment. But the Peachy Green Clean Cooperative is doing things differently. 

It was established in 2015 when the board of directors of the Economic Justice Coalition wanted to create a business that pays a living wage, is worker-owned, and democratically controlled. Soon after, the Peachy Green Clean Co-op was created. It is an all-natural green cleaning business with affordable and negotiable rates. 

The business adheres to the triple-bottom-line—people, planet, and profit—to ensure that they are benefiting their customers, coworkers, and community. To achieve this goal, the business is worker-owned and registered as a member of the US Federation of Worker Cooperatives.

They also stress the importance of paying their employees a living wage while maintaining profitability. Many of the workers were paid little-to-no salary before working at the Peachy Green Clean Co-op. Now, they are paid a living wage so they can afford to purchase their own cars and apartments. 

There are currently 6 coworkers, one of which is Patrick Davenport. He began managing retail when he was 19. He learned quickly that “compassion for all mankind and customer service is key!” 

As the company approaches its 5 year anniversary, he believes the business would best benefit from focusing on scheduling and providing outstanding customer service. 

Patrick Davenport also serves as the Athens-Clarke County Commissioner. While working both positions, he has noticed many parallels between his two jobs. “As a commissioner I get to help make policy that makes people happy. As a business owner, I get to make people happy by helping them come to a clean home or office. Both positions allow me to help someone.”

His passion to help people drove him to run for District 1 Commissioner. It is that same passion that fuels the Peachy Green Clean Cooperative to improve the workers’ lives and the larger community.

Leave a Reply